homemade yogurt

Once you get a hang of the process, you will never get store-bought yogurt again!

 

I am not big on dairy, but I got into yogurt making when I was doing research about the best foods to rebuild the intestinal flora; those microbes that inhabit our body, and that help us digest food, absorb nutrients, fight invaders that cause infection, and other complications in the body, are found in fermented foods like yogurt.

 

In her book Gut and Psychology syndrome, Dr. Natasha Campbell Mc Bride talks extensively about the importance of a healthy gut flora as a basis to cure a lot of digestive disorders, as well as even psychological disorders like autism and ADD to mention just a couple. I highly recommend looking her up on YouTube, or even buying her book.

 

I believe  that health starts in our digestive system; if something is out of balance with our digestive tract we can experience a wide array of symptoms from headaches, bloating, to allergies, depression, as well as chronic digestive, and possibly psychological disorders.

 

When we make yogurt, we are fermenting the milk, we put fresh milk in contact with friendly bacteria, these bacteria will do their job, which will thicken the milk and create a yummy sour, tangy taste. If you ferment your yogurt long enough, it will practically be lactose free, as the bacteria will feed on the milk sugar (lactose), and produce lactic acid; this acid will make the milk curdle and will give yogurt the consistency that we know, as well as help preserve the yogurt longer.

 

If you are serious about yogurt I highly recommend investing in a yogurt maker. You won’t regret it! They will save you several failed attempts. They do a great job, and They are easy to clean!

 

 

 

I like to work with high quality freezer dried starters, which you can find in your local health food store, as opposed to using commercial yogurt as a starter. It has yielded the best results so far for me. I won’t mention brands, but just make sure to read the labels and that is has the least amount of ingredients in it.  They should only contain: Organic Milk and live active cultures.

 

Lactose intolerance: (inability to digest the sugar lactose in milk)

If you are lactose intolerant, you might find that you can digest homemade yogurt quite well, just make sure to ferment it long enough following the package instructions.

 

Casein and Whey:

If you have several allergies and food intolerances be aware that homemade yogurt will still contain Casein and whey, which are the proteins found in milk, and which some people are allergic to. This happens when your immune system wrongly thinks that the protein is harmful, and produces antibodies for protection. So please exercise caution.

 

Coconut Flavored Yogurt

You can flavor your yogurt naturally by adding a about 1/3 cup of whipped coconut milk to 3/4 cup to your home made yogurt, it is really good!

 

How To Make Yogurt
Author: 
 
You can flavor your yogurt naturally by adding a about ⅓ cup of whipped coconut milk to ¾ cup to your home made yogurt, it is really good! You will need: A medium size pot A whisk a small bowl
Ingredients
  • 1 packet of freeze dried cultures
  • 1 quart (one liter) of organic, grass fed pasteurized or unpasteurized milk (preferred)
  • And of course a yogurt maker, or a one quart mason jar if you haven’t bought your yogurt maker yet.
Instructions
  1. Bring the milk to about 180 F (just below the boiling point). It is very important to heat the milk very gently, use the lowest heat setting on your stove. It will take about 40 minutes to reach 180 degrees.
  2. Cool the milk to room temperature, about 110 F
  3. Scoop about a cup of the milk and place in a bowl, add your starter packet, and mix thoroughly using your whisk.
  4. Add this mixture to the rest of the milk
  5. Transfer to your yogurt maker and incubate according to your yogurt maker and the instructions from the culture package that you bought (different types of yogurt have different incubating times), usually 8 hours.
  6. If you don’t have a yogurt maker, place the milk in a glass jar, cover and incubate for about 8 hours inside your oven with just the light on. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours before serving.
  7. Bring the milk to about 110 F, this will activate the cultures and start the fermentation process.
  8. Scoop about a cup of the milk and place in a bowl, add your starter packet, and mix thoroughly using your whisk.
  9. Add this mixture to the rest of the milk
  10. Transfer to your yogurt maker and incubate according to the instructions from the culture package that you bought ( different types of yogurt have different incubating times), usually 8 hours
  11. If you don’t have a yogurt maker, place the milk in a glass jar, cover and incubate for about 8 hours inside your oven with just the light on. Refrigerate for at least 6 hours before serving.
  12. Raw milk might yields a slightly thinner yogurt, but this is easily solved by straining it with a cheese cloth, until the desired consistency is reached.
  13. Coconut Flavored Yogurt

The first couple batches might be a bit frustrating, but from my experience, using the best quality ingredients will make a huge difference

Share your comments below, and feel free to ask any questions.